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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/16/2018 4:54:02 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Strava’s Privacy Settings
mhh — Users can choose to make personal heatmaps. It’s optional and you need to push the button. Sharing your real-time location is a Premium feature and you choose to turn it on, In Privacy Settings you have the option to turn on the following: Enhanced Privacy, Private by Default, Group Activity Enhanced Privacy, Hide from Leaderboards, Hide from Flybys, Anonymized Data: Hide Anonymized Data in Metro and Heatmaps. There is an explanation of what each of those things does when you turn them on. Further customize your Privacy at http://www.stava.com/settings/privacy to: Hide your home, office, or any other locations by creating Privacy Zones. Did they created a Privacy Zone? No. Whose fault is this? Theirs.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/16/2018 4:37:39 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
Mhh, if the military people don’t know how to use the settings in their applications they shouln’t use the applications, or they should set the privacy and security setting accondingly to operational security code they have to follow. If they don’t protect their security and privacy why someone else should have to do it for them? The application has a “Record” button. It’s up to the user to record their route. The application doesn’t record anything by itself. You need to push the button. You can also choose to turn on or off the GPS.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/16/2018 4:22:20 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
Barye, you can always control the applications through the settings. That’s what they are for.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/16/2018 4:21:02 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
Oh, really, Joe? The US military bases are not the centre of the planet. If the military people don’t know how to use the settings of the applications they use they have two choices: not to use any of those applications or learn how to use the settings to protect their data. The application does much more than what you assume it does. And in any case, other people on the planet have the right to use the application for whatever they consider is good for them. Good part of the problem here is not really knowing how the application works, what it does, and some people not knowing how to use the security and privacy settings. It’s not just about the developers.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/16/2018 4:13:58 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
No, Joe. I use Strava. The application broadcasts your data, sure, if the user’s settings allow it. Isn’t that the responsibility of the user?

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mhhfive
mhhfive
2/5/2018 3:16:40 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
>"You can choose to switch off the GPS and don't track your route. It's up to you what you choose to share"

So does this mean a whole bunch of military people are now in violation of operational security duty? The Uniform Code of Military Justice has some harsh penalties for this kind of violation....

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batye
batye
2/5/2018 3:17:25 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
@Joe Stanganelli for me it a scary new reality where things do happens not under our control... 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/4/2018 5:13:59 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
> "Do you think it's better to stop developing applications that can help people just because there are some people out there that might use them to "locate US military bases"

Kinda, yeah.

I mean, "help people" is broad. But we're not talking about ending world hunger here. We're talking about an app that's essentially a combination of an automated stopwatch and a really souped-up pedometer.

That said, sure, develop and use whatever apps you want, I say. But all I'm saying is that developers should go into development with a privacy-first and security-first mentality -- something we rarely see.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/4/2018 4:32:31 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
> Strava doesn't broadcast your data.

But...um...that's exactly what they did, and what these news stories are about -- broadcasting user data.

Even pseuodymized or anonymized, the allowance of collection of personal data presents a "tragedy of the commons" type of situation when it comes to privacy issues -- revealing information that is sensitive to not only about the users but also to non-users.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/4/2018 12:57:17 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Why show off this data? Why even have it?
No, Joe. The user has the power over their data. You can choose to switch off the GPS and don’t track your route. It’s up to you what you choose to share, track, or enable within your application and settings. Strava doesn’t broadcast your data. You do if you choose to do it.

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