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batye
batye
2/13/2018 1:16:41 PM
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Guardian
Re: How do they know?
@mhhfive from what I heard and read online NK hackers trained and grommed by NK gov. with help from China gov. but as you know you never know what is the truth...  

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mhhfive
mhhfive
2/13/2018 1:00:53 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
batye, right -- the KGB agents were govt sponsored, and that's why I assume North Korean hackers are, too. I could be wrong. Maybe there is some elite group of Norh Koreans who aren't somehow tied to the government? 

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batye
batye
2/12/2018 11:37:02 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
@mhhfive during Cold War... Russia have food shortages and no medicine for the sick russians but KGB agent always have everything what they need for the missions to destroy the west... same apply to NK in my books... as game never change... 

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/8/2018 1:53:43 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
This is interesting, the 1% or rich kids and Millennials in North Korea: https://youtu.be/2tANRAb3KKg who definitely have access to anything they need as hackers such as skills, travelling to China, computers, and Internet. And they don’t have to be sponsored by the government. They can do it all on their own.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/8/2018 1:30:58 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
Perhaps the stories you hear are the stories that the US media wants people to hear. I haven’t been to North Korea, but I’ve been in New York where the sight of homeless in the freezing winter who don’t seem to have enough basic food contrasts to all what New York is known for. And I wondered why the government doesn’t know anything about those people. Their people. This is to say that such contrast you can find mostly anywhere in the world. Blind children in North Korea learn computer skills (2015): https://youtu.be/2gJsLDbpOw0 Not only computer skills, and in English. It’s a double learning process happening simultaneously in the brain. This develops the brain faster and further than others. It takes only one of those kids to develop their skills further, and why not to become a hacker in the future. The potential is in everyone, anywhere in the world. I am not saying cybercriminals are not government sponsored. But then again, cybercriminals can be government sponsored anywhere, not just in North Korea. Or on their own.

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mhhfive
mhhfive
2/7/2018 9:21:01 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
I dunno.. when I hear stories about several people in North Korea suffering from malnutrition and tape worms -- it doesn't inspire much confidence that there are also well-fed hackers somewhere who aren't government sponsored. The North Korea nuclear program is government sponsored, and I suspect so are all the cybercriminals. These skills aren't just picked up by people without food to eat or computers to type on.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/7/2018 8:40:38 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
I am no expert in North Korea. And I suppose we are all mostly assuming here, since it’s quite difficult to know the truth. That said, hackers are not like other regular people. Most hackers are highly resourceful. A satellite image of North Korea at night mostly in the dark doesn’t mean anything. There are pleanty of reasons for that. The whole image doesn’t point at what hackers do. Hackers, however, don’t really need light to do what they do. Haven’t you ever worked in the dark only with the light of your screen? I have done that plenty of times. There are plenty of ways of getting computers and some Internet connection, even if it’s just for a few hours. Even if the same things are hard to get for regular people, we are talking about hackers here. Hackers get what they need to get to do what they believe they have to do.

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mhhfive
mhhfive
2/7/2018 5:46:52 PM
User Rank
Guardian
State sponsored?
> "it's not clear if the group is associated with the country or operating on its own."

How many organizations in North Korea exist with resources that are comparable to the State? I didn't think North Korea had many private entities that operated independent of its government? 

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mhhfive
mhhfive
2/7/2018 5:44:20 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
Do North Korean hackers have the same resources? They have limited internet connectivity, no? How do they have access to hardware? Aren't there trade embargoes on just about everything? I assume North Korea hires bad guys from other countries to do their hacking, but maybe I'm wrong. I just remember seeing the satellite images of North Korea at night -- and seeing how dark it is compared to South Korea. If they don't have lights on.. do they have access to the same computers and internet? 

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
2/7/2018 8:06:18 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: How do they know?
Don’t they have access to the same resources all the other hackers do, or what do you mean?

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