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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
5/7/2018 2:39:45 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
Agreed. Perhaps if everyone would start doing their job rather than someone else’s then economists, too, could step up their game.

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mhhfive
mhhfive
5/5/2018 7:17:40 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
Trade barriers are always going to come up as long as economists are disregarded as experts. Economists really have to step up their game to be more trustworthy. But I suppose economics isn't called the dismal science for nothing....

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
5/5/2018 5:02:36 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
Yes. Also, why certain politicians think they have the absolute right to step into other areas that is not part of the job description?

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mhhfive
mhhfive
5/5/2018 12:02:53 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
These protectionist policies make me wonder if industries will develop their own authentication programs to ensure security and avoid political excuses of "insecure" hardware. If all manufacturers were held to the same audited controls for security-- there might not be a credible way for politicians to say one country's products were less secure.

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
5/5/2018 12:31:25 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
Let’s have a quick look again at the Broadcom-Qualcomm case and then connect the dots. It’s not that difficult> https://www.securitynow.com/author.asp?section_id=613&doc_id=741369

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
5/5/2018 12:11:53 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
That’s a great point. Unless electronic components manufacturers have an exclusive contract with one smartphone manufacturer, some of the components go into all or most the phones. I agree with Huawei’s statement. And have met CEOs from ZTE, who always impressed me in how noble they are and how hard they work. This is not about real security or privacy issues. This is yet one more move from who is directing the politics in the US. You missed Windows phones in the mix. The only phones allowed are going to be from American companies. And that is not going to be based on technology but in pure politics according to the current government’s desires.

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mhhfive
mhhfive
5/4/2018 7:33:31 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
Considering that many of the same components in these Huawei phones also end up in iPhones and Samsung phones, I wouldn't be surprised if these Chinese companies simply re-brands their phones to avoid the trade barriers.

Also, why are Chinese companies singled out? Korean smartphone makers are somehow more trustworthy? Finnish smartphone makers are somehow better?

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Susan Fourtané
Susan Fourtané
5/4/2018 3:32:08 AM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: These policies remind me...
That’s a great story with a lesson that once again, sadly tells about human behaviour. Basically, the company prefers its employees to make up items to include in expenses rather than reported the real items the employee needed. Arriving all wet to a meeting perhaps was not goig to be a good image for such company. What if he does that next time? When asked, he could tell his company doesn’t pay for umbrellas? :D

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mhhfive
mhhfive
5/3/2018 11:00:12 PM
User Rank
Guardian
These policies remind me...
I vaguely recall a humorous story of how a sales guy was once denied an item on his expense report because he honestly reported he bought an umbrella -- and some bean counter denied it wasn't a legit expense for the company. So all it taught the sales guy was to more cleverly hide his expenses and be far less honest. I assume Chinese manufacturers will simply find a way to better hide their equipment in products that aren't so easily identified....

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