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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/8/2019 6:57:21 PM
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Re: GDPR fines?
@mhh: I'm not sure that question and its answer matter much.

One of the first lessons I learned in law school: the five theories of punishment:

1) General deterrence: Making an example out of a do-badder to dissuade others from doing the same.

2) Specific deterrence: Punishing a do-badder harshly enough that they think twice before doing it again.

3) Restraint: Keeping a likely to reoffend do-badder away from others so that they can't victimize others/society during the time of their punishment.

4) Rehabilitation: While often not "punishment" in the normal sense of the word, rehabilitation seeks to prevent do-badders from recommitting misdeeds down the line.

I pause here to note that those four theories have something in common: They are (if applied correctly and appropriately) pragmatic, focusing on preventing do-baddery in the future.

The fifth theory of punishment differs in this regard.

5) Retribution.

The theory of retribution is that society is owed an intangible debt; that society demands and cries out (figuratively, if not literally) for the do-badder to experience suffering.

Here in the west (on both sides of the pond), and elsewhere in the world, we live in a very retributivist society right now in this, the early 20th century. While the DPAs seem to be, generally, more focused on the other theories of punishment in enforcing GDPR, I suspect that GDPR was promulgated with retribution in mind -- particularly when it comes to the much-despised-by-EU-policymakers tech giants like Facebook and Google.




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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
12/31/2018 3:00:09 PM
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Guardian
Re: At least relatively quick
Yes, i noticed that companies are coming forward more lately to involve corp communications when compared to the past. That is a good trend.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
12/31/2018 2:58:16 PM
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Guardian
Re: Effective PR management
Yeah, that is actually true. Tey did play cover up as well in the past for sure.

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mhhfive
mhhfive
12/4/2018 1:31:26 PM
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Guardian
GDPR fines?
Will GDPR fines matter much *after* the fact? It's not like the fine is a deterrent when the crime has already occurred -- and it seems like some of these companies are victims, too. Do the GDPR fines kick in for negligent breaches -- or all breaches? 

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batye
batye
12/1/2018 11:57:19 PM
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Guardian
Re: Troubling news
@Michelle  depends how you look at it as smaller size Co. tend to have less security... unless it small size security Co. 

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Michelle
Michelle
11/30/2018 10:55:11 PM
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Guardian
Re: Troubling news
Super! No matter the size, any company can be targeted. Equal targeting... heh

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
11/30/2018 10:54:44 PM
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Re: At least relatively quick
@ms.a: I read an article/op-ed recently about the importance of getting corporate-communications people proactively and preemptively involved and coordinated with cybersecurity teams so that there's a plan on how to respond from their perspective, while having an understanding of the actual technological considerations, right away. Definitely a good practice.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
11/30/2018 10:53:05 PM
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Re: Effective PR management
@ms.a: To say nothing of Uber, which actively worked to cover up their mega-breach of a couple years ago!

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
11/30/2018 6:51:29 PM
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Guardian
Re: Effective PR management
Yes, It made sense when started thinking in their perspective. If we really think from their end, they did a decent job revealing this news in 20 days compared to other organizations that delayed extensively to come out.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
11/30/2018 6:49:35 PM
User Rank
Guardian
Re: Marriott comes under attack
Yup, ths is the hot friday reveal for public. Not a pleasant way to end the week.

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